Burger Kings Purchase of Tim Horton’s and What it Means to Its Franchisees

Will Tim Horton’s Franchisees win or lose in this massive food and beverage deal as Burger King gobbles them up? And will they sell Tim Burgers?

It’s pretty rare to have news this big in the food and beverage industry, and especially one that impacts Canadian business so directly.  A quick search engine search on the keywords reveals articles like this one in the CBC.  This article is loaded with neat little stats about how big the two companies are, how much there shares went up and down, market cap numbers, guesses on why they did it,  what they will do next, and so on.  A very typical ‘business article’.

The article also went into details about the ‘important’ parts of the deal including where the head offices would be based, shareholder cash payments, and the like.  However, the following statement jumped off the page: “That would bring the cash value of the deal for current Tim Hortons owners to more than $94 per share.”   In particular, it is the usage of the word ‘owners’ that is most intriguing and one that leads to a new question: “Who owns a Tim Horton’s store?”

“Who owns a Tim Horton’s store?”

Perhaps a better question to start with is ‘what is ownership?’

According to corporate stuff, it’s someone who owns any number of shares in a corporation.  In real estate, it’s the person or entity whose name is on the title document.  For cars, it’s the ‘registered owner’ on the document you hand the police when they pull you over.  In small business, it’s the person upon whom takes the ultimate financial risks associated with it’s success or demise.

However, anyone involved in any of these ‘ownership’ scenarios knows something deeper: in corporations, it’s the person with 51% of the shares who has power.  In real estate, it’s the person to whom you pay your taxes who holds the power.  With cars, the police officer holds the power and tells you how you are going to use your car, and in small business, it’s the landlord, health authorities, and, in some cases, the Franchisor who holds the power.

So, does ownership really even exist? Or does the more important question when you make an investment become, ‘Who holds the power over my investment?”

Tim Horton’s was built on the back of it’s Franchisees, on their hard earned investments, and on their long, hard days serving the public cheap coffee.  Although these ‘business articles’ will talk about ‘revenue from royalties’ on the books, when was the last time you heard about Tim Horton’s from the perspective of a Franchisee?

Although this merger looks like a good deal for the power holders (shareholders and directors), one must wonder what will happen to the Franchisees.  Will things get better?  Will things get worse? Even more frightening of a question is “Does anyone even care?”

Customers just want their cheap double double.  They don’t care who hands it to them.

The Franchisor just wants a higher share value, sometimes at any cost.

Would anyone care if the Tim Burger’s global strategy one day switched from ‘Franchise Partners’ to ‘Corporately Managed’ stores like Starbucks did?

So next time you order your six pack of Tim Burgers or Whopper-Whopper think of who really built this business and be concerned.  This is your brother, uncle and neighbour, not a number on a stock exchange.